W Moscow
nycartscene:

Opens Tonight, Oct 10, 6-8p: “Ready For Their Stones” Juan HinojosaAllegra LaViola Gallery, 179 East Broadway, NYC (F to E. B’Way)Hinojosa’s interest in religious figures is merged with a fascination for fantasy, consumer culture and comic book characters. As Saints are revered for their dedication to God and their desire for goodness in the face of evil, so too are the superheroes that Hinojosa deems worthy of worship. - thru Nov 10

nycartscene:

Opens Tonight, Oct 10, 6-8p:

Ready For Their Stones
 Juan Hinojosa

Allegra LaViola Gallery, 179 East Broadway, NYC (F to E. B’Way)

Hinojosa’s interest in religious figures is merged with a fascination for fantasy, consumer culture and comic book characters. As Saints are revered for their dedication to God and their desire for goodness in the face of evil, so too are the superheroes that Hinojosa deems worthy of worship. - thru Nov 10

oldbookillustrations:

Le rat (pupil of the Opéra de Paris ballet class).
Paul Gavarni, from Les français peints par eux-mêmes (Pictures of the French) vol. 3, collective work, Paris, 1850.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Le rat (pupil of the Opéra de Paris ballet class).

Paul Gavarni, from Les français peints par eux-mêmes (Pictures of the French) vol. 3, collective work, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

The (Marseille) porter.
Émile Loubon from Les français peints par eux-mêmes (Pictures of the French) vol. 3, collective work, Paris, 1850.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

The (Marseille) porter.

Émile Loubon from Les français peints par eux-mêmes (Pictures of the French) vol. 3, collective work, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

blackcontemporaryart:

Klansman (Imperial Wizard III), Andres Serrano, 1990

blackcontemporaryart:

Klansman (Imperial Wizard III), Andres Serrano, 1990

owenhouhoulis:

Artists: Ghada Amer & Reza Farkhondeh

owenhouhoulis:

Artists: Ghada Amer & Reza Farkhondeh

(via dailyartspace)

ceramicsnow:

Martin Creed on My Modern Metropolis
Contemporary art doesn’t get much more fun than this! First created in 1998 with white balloons and then redone many times over, Half the Air in a Given Space is an interactive installation, by British artist Martin Creed, that’s comprised of hundreds or thousands of balloons of the same color. As the name suggests, half a room’s entire volume is filled with air-inflated balloons and then visitors are encouraged to walk through. “It is important to me,” says Creed, “that the situation is normal, that, as usual, the space is full of air; it’s just that half of it [is] inside the balloons.”

Meant to evoke a sense of celebration and remembrance of childhood, the installation is almost guaranteed to leave everyone with a smile on their face.

Last year, Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas was graced with 9,000 giant gold balloons that filled half of an eight-foot high gallery. To get a sense of what it feels like inside the room, Anna Merian of the Dallas Observer wrote, “People kept emerging from the balloons and startling each other — you’d feel totally alone and then suddenly, a face would come looming up out of the yellowness and you’d smile sheepishly at each other, then go back to flailing and squealing and butterfly-stroking your way through the balloons.”

In Chicago, Creed has installed four versions of this work in neighborhoods throughout the city, choosing a different color balloon for each site. The first two installations (Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago) can be experienced through October 2nd and October 15th at the Hyde Park Art Center and Garfield Park Conservatory. In addition, this fantastically fun installation is coming to The Cleveland Museum of Art from September 30 through November 25, 2012. (via)

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ceramicsnow:

Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

Japanese design studio Nendo has conceived a collection of ‘Mimicry Chairs’ composed of pressed and punched metal and lacquered white to give it a ghost-like aesthetic. The project’s philosophy is generated through reinterpreting and multiplying a single white chair in ten different ways, where the series will then appear in ten varying locations throughout the V&A Victoria & Albert Museum. During 2012 London Design Festival - the experience beginning in the main entrance of the museum. The journey then carries on throughout the space - positioning the chairs in galleries, staircases and corridors. each design has been carefully created to reflect and ‘mimic’ the location in which it is placed - poetically communicating the relationship an object shares with its environment. (via designboom)

Photos by Daici Ano.

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(Source: arpeggia)

ceramicsnow:

Daehyun Kim Illustrations

Daehyun Kim, also known as moonassi, is a young illustrator from Seoul, South Korea. Kim draws with a beautiful minimalistic approach. He shows an underlying theme of identity and human relationships with a background discipline in traditional Korean painting. (via)

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ceramicsnow:

Tim Hawkinson - Mobius Ship, 2011

Tim Hawkinson was born in San Francisco, California, in 1960. A graduate of San Jose State University, he later earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1989. Hawkinson is renowned for creating complex sculptural systems through surprisingly simple means. His installation, “Überorgan”—a stadium-size, fully automated bagpipe—was pieced together from bits of electrical hardware and several miles of inflated plastic sheeting. Hawkinson’s fascination with music and notation can also be seen in “Pentecost,” a work in which the artist tuned cardboard tubes and assembled them in the shape of a giant tree. On this tree, the artist placed twelve life-size robotic replicas of himself, and programmed them to beat out religious hymns at humorously irregular intervals. The source of inspiration for many of Hawkinson’s pieces has been the re-imagining of his own body, and what it means to make a self-portrait of this new or fictionalized body. In 1997, the artist created an exacting, two-inch-tall skeleton of a bird from his own fingernail parings, and later made a feather and egg from his own hair; believable even at a close distance, these works reveal Hawkinson’s attention to detail as well as his obsession with life, death, and the passage of time. Hawkinson has participated in numerous exhibitions in the United States and abroad, including the Venice Biennale (1999); Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (2000); the Power Plant, Toronto (2000); the Whitney Biennial (2002); and the 2003 Corcoran Biennial, Washington, DC. Tim Hawkinson resides in Los Angeles with his wife. (via)

Tim Hawkinson on art21.

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(Source: likeafieldmouse)

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